Thursday, August 11, 2016

Things Cameramen Must Know About an Eisa Matsuri

Eisa, dancers, night, stage, drums

It's a Fairly Lively Crowd

 

 

Everybody likes to have their pictures taken but, they won't hold still.

As the sun goes down, you need a wide open aperture and high ISO's to catch the action.

People in the audience are friendly, offering you food and things to drink.

While moving around, to get the best photos, it's best to look behind you.

Just like, you don't want anyone ruining your scene, you shouldn't be blocking others views.


dancing with drums, musicians on stage, pola and village banner


Everybody familiar with me, in this town, knows I've developed a taste for fine spirits.

And, they try to give me beers, awamori (local sake) and things like that.

But, I tell them, when they see me holding a big camera, I'm working.

When the day's work is done, I'll go out and tip a few cups of my favorite beverages.


drums, dancers, stage, musicians, village banner


Sometimes, you can get close to the action and, the crowd, won't get in your way.

Other times, it's best to pick a good location and, zoom in on the dancers.


Being able, to speak some local dialect comes in handy, at times, for a photographer.

It helps, to move around to an advantageous position, where you can compose your shots.

A disadvantage, is when some boozed-up local, wants you to help translate to a American.

It's best to just say, "Sorry Dude, I'm working as a cameraman today."


festival crowd, cameraman, Eisa dancers

Once, when I was moving  back through the crowd, I met this girl.

She said, "Mikesan, you remember me?"

Um, I remembered her from a turtle release, a few years ago but, not her name.

What was I supposed to say, "Yeah, you're the turtle lady?"

The next day, I got this photo from her on Facebook and, now I know her name.

Thank you Asami.  You're a sweetheart !
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